How To Be A Motivational Speaker (Part 7) Find a Niche


How To be A Motivational Speaker | Reach Your Niche Get Rich

A How-To video series about how to be a motivational speaker.   In this very informal video in which Brad Montgomery — a funny motivational speaker — Brad asks his pal and fellow motivational speaker and Colorado speaker Fred Berns for a killer tip for folks on their way to being a paid professional speaker.    He has some great advice about getting deep with one industry.

Check out the video:

Thanks Fred baby!

How to be a Comedian

Interested in learning how to use humor in your presentation? Check out Brad’s Got Mirth: Milking Your Presentation for all the Humor It’s Worth.

Learn more about how to be a motivational speaker with my how-to audio here.be-a-speaker-labelweb

Related:
Blog Posts:
How to Be a Motivational Speaker (Part 1) | Get a Mentor
How To Be A Motivational Speaker (2) Choose the Right Topic
How To Be Speaker (3) Format of a Keynote. A Template!
Adding Humor (1) The Act Out
Adding Humor (2): Give the Audience a Voice
Adding Humor (3) What to Do When Your Humor Bombs
Part 7:  How to Be a Motivational Speaker — Find A Niche to Make you Rich
Part 8:  Be a Professional Speaker — Be Authentic On the Platform

More interested in reading the transcription than seeing the video.  No problem baby!  We have your back.  Here it is:

How to be a motivational Speaker.  Fred Berns on Niches

Brad Montgomery:         Hi, this is Brad Montgomery from bradmontgomery.com with the continuing series about how to be a motivational speaker.  So, I know you want to be a motivational speaker.  You don’t know how.  You want tips.  Well, I don’t have them all, but I’ve got friends who have them all.  We’re here with Fred Berns, one of the top speakers in Colorado.  He speaks on a million things, including sales.  Fred, can you give the listeners what’s it going to take to be a motivational speaker?

Fred Berns:         Well, I think to be a successful motivational speaker, it’s very important to have a specific niche.  I think a niche can make you rich.  And if you can zero in on a certain type of group, a different kind – a certain type of industry, I think you become viewed as an instant expert a lot more quickly.  You can sell books and products a lot more successfully.  You can be booked more often with, for larger amounts of money if you become the number one name in a specific industry.  So, I think the key here, Brad, is to niche because it can make you rich.

Brad Montgomery:                  Rock on!

On YouTube
Part 1. Find a Speaker Mentor
Part 2. Choose a Correct Motivational Topic (on YouTube)
How to be a Motivational Speaker (3) on YouTube
Adding Humor (1) The Act Out (On YouTube)
Adding Humor (2): Give the Audience a Voice (on YouTube)
Adding Humor (3) What to Do When Your Humor Bombs (YouTube)
Part 7: How To be a Speaker — Find a Niche
Part 8: How to be a Motivational Speaker — Be Authentic on the Platform

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8 thoughts on “How To Be A Motivational Speaker (Part 7) Find a Niche

  1. I SO agree with Fred in this video abut finding a niche to talk to as a motivational speaker. Then you can design your content, humor, examples, etc right to what they need and want to hear. I am niched in the military family market and just presented a humor piece on the overuse of acronyms that was a huge hit. It certainly wouldn’t have meant a thing to another audience. You go, Fred because I know your stuff resonates with the interior design industry!

  2. I agree with you both. One of the many reasons Fred rocks so hard is because he has picked a specific topic for a specific industry.

    As for acronyms and the military, yup…that is a really funny premise. There are two easy ways to turn acronyms into humor: either make up a differernt meaning for a common acronym… or just purposely misunderstand how to use the common acronyms.

    I once spoke to a tech group and used their acronyms WRONG and it went well because they could see that somebody could easily mis-use them, and it was sort of an easy way into the laughs.

    Thanks Elaine. Would have loved to hear you speak to the military!

  3. Fred is right. The best thing I did as a beginning…and now old!…speaker was to pick a niche and go deep. I originally thought my message was important for the whole world…but it is hard to send a postcard or email to the whole world! I thought about, what group of people do I know best? where do I have credibility? Identifying and studying my niche makes me the expert…so people want to hire me!Good advice Fred!
    LeAnn

  4. Very cool, LeAnn. Thanks for the added advice. You’re career is an excellent example of going into a niche. Yippee!

    Has anybody had success w/o niching? (Look Mom! I made up a verb!)

  5. There’s an exception to every rule — and, Brad, you’re a good example.

    No, I haven’t changed my mind that a niche can make you reach, and being a big name in an industry can lead to big success.

    But there are certain topics that cut across all niches, and resonate with everyone.

    And that’s where Brad comes in.

    Brad is such rock star when it comes to humor that he hits home runs with every group he addresses. That is, the dude makes EVERYONE laugh, no matter what the industry or niche.

    Morale of the story: Be really, really funny, and you’ll be successful speaking to any group, at any time.

  6. Thanks Fred. The truth is that I’ve never worked for anybody who wasn’t my brother, sister, mom…. you get the idea.

    Brad

    PS. My last name is Walton.

    PPS. The octomom is my sister. So in about 30 years I’ll get more work. :)

  7. Fred is absolutely right in pointing out that you need to stick to your niche. Its no use being jack of all trades and master of none. Specialize in a specific topic, and advertise your skills. You’re sure to get a lot of work.

  8. Hello all! I like this forum, i set up numberless gripping people on this forum.!!!

    Pronounced Community, respect all!

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